Falling for the Foodini

It's Friday.  The day before Halloween.  Parents are thinking about how to keep gobs of candy out of their kids' mouths while simultaneously stealing a piece or two.  Kids have already been celebrating Halloween at school, where holidays seem to have an extended shelf-life, especially when they happen to fall over the weekend. 

Thought it would be a fun day to highlight the latest food tech gadget that seems, well, either really neat or totally useless.  Or perhaps both. 

The Foodini. 

It's a 3D food printer that makes "real food from real ingredients."  Their shtick is that of course it's easy to pop something less than nutritious in the microwave, or open a box of something ready to go - the Foodini, as described, helps us move away from this, helps us eat less 'processed food' (I really don't like that word because it can mean so many things but they do use it...).  As the company explains it, "Foodini is a kitchen appliance that takes on the difficult parts of making food that is hard or time-consuming to make fully by hand. By 3D printing food, you automate some of the assembly or finishing steps of home cooking, thus making it easier to create freshly made meals and snacks."

Apparently the Foodini makes sweet and savory foods.  It can print foods in a matter of minutes, like flat breads or crackers.  More intricate foods can take longer.  It also can connect to your FitBit and be programmed to stop printing once it reaches a certain number of calories. 

source: http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/R-D/Natural-Machines-co-founder-explains-merits-of-the-Foodini-3D-printer/?utm_source=newsletter_daily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=30-Oct-2015&c=QfRCNDgD4MIpHaRVParofg%3D%3D&p2=

source: http://www.foodnavigator-usa.com/R-D/Natural-Machines-co-founder-explains-merits-of-the-Foodini-3D-printer/?utm_source=newsletter_daily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=30-Oct-2015&c=QfRCNDgD4MIpHaRVParofg%3D%3D&p2=

The company of course claims that the food tastes good and that it's up to the user how the end product fares (based, of course, on the ingredients used).

The Foodini (once it becomes available) will cost about $1,500.  Steep, though I guess if it makes unlimited options, is easy to use and tastes good, perhaps it's worth a try.  Seems like a great gimmick, albeit one that takes up coveted counter space.   I do hope it works better than the home printers we've churned through over the years.